Sources for Information on Strength Training

Sources for Information on Strength Training

As I mention on the strength page, it is hard to get reliable information on strength training, particularly if you are inexperienced. Therefore I have made this little list as a starting point for you who are about to broaden your horizon on the noble quest of strength. I wish I had had this list when I started working out many years ago, It would have saved me a lot of time and gotten me results much faster.

Book recommendations post 1950

For starting strength and building a foundation on which to build on I highly recommend the following:

Rippetoe, M. & Kilgore, L. (2011). Starting strength : Basic barbell training (3rd ed.). Wichita Falls, TX: Aasgaard Co.

or

Rippetoe, M. & Kilgore, L. (2007). Starting strength – basic barbell training (S. Bradford, Ed.). (2nd ed.). Wichita Falls, Tex.: Aasgaard Co.

I own both and while the 3rd edition is a worthy upgrade you cannot really go wrong with either. This is an excellent introduction to the iron game and will weed out most misconceptions about strength training that you might have. I say introduction because it is aimed towards the beginner in terms of physical progress, but the contents are far from limited to the beginner. It focuses on barbell training and if you follow the programs in it you will build a very very good foundation for an strength training. Even if you don’t do anything else, this program can make you very, very strong. I would recommend this to any strength athlete who haven’t read it. For further progress, his follow up is a great read too- it will make you think about and understand why programs are designed as they are so you can adjust to your personal circumstances:

Rippetoe, M., Kilgore, L., & Pendlay, G. (2006). Practical programming for strength training. Wichita Falls, Tex.: Aasgaard Co.

Also aimed at the beginner and with a focus on barbell training, but with a focus on simplicity I equally highly recommend:

Tsatsouline, P. (2000). Power to the people : Russian strength training secrets for every american. St. Paul, MN: Dragon Door Publications.

And from the same author, a very very god book on kettle bell use, from programming, to execution to history:

Tsatsouline, P. (2006). Enter the kettlebell!: Strengh secret of the soviet supermen. United States: Dragon Door Publications.

Both authors are contemporary, well known and worth your while.

Brooks is also contemporary and all about maximum strength and variability on a no-drug basis.

Brooks, K. D. (2006). Dinosaur training: Lost secrets of strength and development (5th ed.). USA: Brooks D. Kubik.

My final contemporary author is Geoff Neupert. He has written a really cool book about some SERIOUS kettle bell training. If you like gasping for air for 3-5 minutes straight, this is the book for you. In combination with regular strength training it will also make you very very strong and well conditioned.

Neupert, G. (2010). Kettlebell muscle: The secrets of compound kettlebell lifting. United States: Dragon Door Publications, Inc.

Book recommendations pre 1950

On my strength page I argue why you should read material on strength training from before  app. 1950 to avoid programs and methods influenced by the availability of steroids and the like.

I have found a fantastic source for books on old school training in Bill Hinberns bookstore. I have bought a number of books from him and get his newsletter. He is a great guy very much in touch with his customers and he sells great stuff. You should visit his site. In the meantime I can recommend the following books from personal experience. They are all written by famous-at-the-time strongmen and if nothing else serves as evidence of how far you can get drug free if you hang in and don’t believe in limits.

Jowett, G. F. (2011). Key to might and muscle (original version, restored). USA: O’Faolain Patriot, LLC : Physical Culture Books. (Original work published 1926)

He is one of the few authors I have seen emphasizing and describing the bridge as a strength tool. Much approved of by me!

Saxon, A. (2011). The text-book of weight-lifting (original version, restored). USA: O’Faolain Patriot, LLC : Physical Culture Books. (Original work published 1910)
Saxon, A. (2011). The development of physical power (original version, restored). USA: O’Faolain Patriot, LLC : Physical Culture Books. (Original work published 1906)
Calvert, A. (2012). Super strength (original version, restored). USA: O’Faolain Patriot, LLC : Physical Culture Books. (Original work published 1924)
Inch, T. (1995). Developing the grip and forearm. USA: Hinbern. (Original work published 1952)
Inch, T. (1932). Thomas inch on strength. USA: Hinbern. (Original work published 2010)
Berry, M. H. (2000). Physical training simplified. Michigan, US: Wm F. Hinbern. (Original work published 1930)
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